Austrade strongly recommends that you bear witness to this once again before the sale in Italy. Customs duties and duties are constantly reviewed and are subject to change without notice. Increased trade creates more Australian jobs and more opportunities for Australian businesses. Learn how to use free trade agreements. Learn more. 6. Japan is Italy`s 6th largest trading partner outside the EU. The trade agreement BETWEEN the EU and Japan will make it easier and cheaper for them to do so. Marking in Italian is usually required. It is advisable to confirm all packaging and labelling requirements with the local importer to ensure compliance with all local requirements. The main Italian imports are metal and mechanical engineering, mainly from Germany, France, the United States and the United Kingdom. Imports of chemicals, vehicles and minerals are also important raw materials. Italy is a major importer of energy, much of which comes from North Africa and the Middle East.

Italy has a great commercial tradition. Deep in the Mediterranean, the country occupies a strategic position and strengthens its trade potential not only with Eastern Europe, but also with North Africa and the Middle East. In the past, Italy maintained active relations with the countries of Eastern Europe, Libya and the Palestinian peoples. These ties have been maintained even in times of great political tension, such as during the Cold War and the 1991 Gulf War. Accession to the EC from 1957 on or after 1957 further increased Italy`s trade potential and led to rapid economic growth. However, from that point on, the economy faced a growing trade deficit. Italy`s trade force has traditionally been built on textiles, food products and industrial goods. However, during the second half of the twentieth century, the products of the nascent Italian metallurgy and mechanical engineering sector, including automobiles, increased to a majority of total exports, which are still maintained; This is followed by the textile, clothing and leather goods sectors. . . . .