Riyadh: Saudi Arabia on Wednesday reached an agreement to create a cooperation unit with six countries on the border with the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden, a crucial strategic area for global shipping. On 9 May 2005, Jordan, Israel and the Palestinian Authority signed an agreement on the feasibility study of the Two Seas Canal. The agreement was signed on the Dead Sea by Jordanian Water Minister Raed Abu Soud, Israeli Infrastructure Minister Binyamin Ben-Eliezer and Palestinian Planning Minister Ghassan al-Khatib. The port of Djibouti is located at the intersection of international waterways. The Chinese state Merchants Port Holdings has acquired 23.5 percent of Port De Djibouti. The port includes the doraleh Container Terminal, which was granted to DP World in 2006 through a 30-year concession contract, but was later nationalized in 2018. Saudi Arabia has announced an agreement to create a unity of countries along the Red Sea and gulf of Aden. In August 2013, the Jordanian government announced that it would advance the first phase of a project. [7] An agreement was signed on December 9, 2013 for the construction of the gas pipeline between Israel, Jordan and Palestine. [8] On June 21, 2016, Jordan announced that it had received 17 offers from international companies for the construction of the canal. [9] The proposed aid would pump seawater 230 meters high from the Gulf of Aqaba, on the Red Sea, through Jordan`s Arabah Valley.

The water would then pass gravitatively into the Dead Sea area through several pipelines, followed by a drop by a pressurized pipe at Dead Sea level near its shore, and then an open channel to the sea itself, located about 420 meters below sea level. The project would use about 225 km of gas pipelines for seawater and brine parallel to Jordan`s Arabah Valley. The project would also have about 178 km of freshwater pipes in the Amman area. It would also include several water desalination plants and at least one hydroelectric power plant. In its final phase, it would produce about 850 million cubic meters of fresh water per year. In June 2009, Israel`s Minister of Regional Cooperation, Silvan Shalom, announced, following a meeting with World Bank President Robert Zoellick, a pilot project to build a 180 km “pilot tube” from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea. The pipe would pump 200 million cubic meters per year. Half of them would be desalinated for Jordanian consumption and half would be transferred to the Dead Sea.

[3] The main port in Sudan is Port Sudan, managed by the Sudanese Sea Ports Corporation. . . .